The Gildehall at Borrehaugene, Norway

This is pretty much what my dream (long)house looks like. If I was filthy rich, I would build a reconstruction like this one right away! These photos were taken a few years ago, under the construction of the Gildehall in Horten. I was there long before they opened the Hall for the public eye and managed to snap these photos. I think it looked pretty amazing this way, as I am quite the fan of wood – but I must say that the blackish paint it sports now looks badass like Hel. I am going to Midgardblot this year too, and that will be a good chance to take quite a few photos of what it looks like these days. Photographing at the site will probably happen before that, though. My my iron horse (*cough* mercedes benz) and I frequently pass the area on our way to visit my parents and I often make a stop at Borrehaugene to breathe some norse vibes.

so tell me;
Are you going to Midgardsblot this year?

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

Medieval inspired photoshoot

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Styling, makeup modeling– she
Photography: Kristian V

Decided to dress in medieval inspired gear, channel some shieldmaiden vibes and take quite a few photos the other day. It was cold as a Fimbulwinter outside, even though it doesn’t look that way, but it was good fun! Luckily, this location is literally right outside my parents house, so I could run inside afterwards- throw all the armor to the ground and enjoy a hot cuppa in front of the fireplace. I used to play in these woods as a kid, or rather – meditate in front of trees for hours. Yes – I was that boring, and of course a sworn tree hugger hippe spirit kind of kid. Bet you didn’t know that. Anyways – I love these items from my dusty wardrobe. Come to think of it – I could easily dress like this every day. The sword would make riding public transportation somewhat of a hassle due to weapon regulations, but hey – other than that, I doubt anyone in Oslo would bat an eye. That’s the beauty of living in a big city- no one cares, they’ve seen pretty much everything before.

BLablabla – I’ll post more pictures from this shoot very soon.

Sól Geirsdóttir

Viking decor – cups and a mug

krusBehold my favorite mug! It is perfect for drinking ale or freshly pressed juice. I purchased it at a Viking Market last summer, underneath it says “Zawistowscy DYWITY” I believe that’s the name of the maker? oseberg12Ps: Is it just me or does this mug look like it was inspired by this Oseberg cart? (…At least I think of this carving when I drink from my mug. Cheers!)krus3I love these cups, and I use them for my daily fix of tea. Bough them at a viking market last summer – and this year I really hope to meet the seller again. krus5The lady who made the cups is from Denmark, and sadly that’s all I know. She didn’t have a business card or anything, but I sure hope to see her again. If anyone reading this knows who she is – please let me know. krus4On another note, I am in the process of moving to my very own apartment and I cannot wait to decorate the new home. Right now, everything is being packed up in boxes and the current place is a huge mess. Cannot wait to unpack and fill my new place with good viking vibes. *whispers* It will be a perfect place to make youtube videos. I know some of you are waiting eagerly for that to happen! Hehe..

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

Everyday shamanism

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This month has been incredibly busy, and I feel as though I have put up a pretty strong mental shield to keep my energy levels high enough to work through it. Being conscious of  one’s health can be quite the challenge at times, especially since we live in a world where there is constant movement – a crash of energies all times. Everything has to happen at such a high speed, and I am pretty sure that this is not something we are meant to be doing. Stress is the root to all evil (my personal opinion). Also – Stress is cited as a common contributing factor of many mental and physical health issues. Taking time to slow down – moving at your own pace is very important. Remember to do that. It took me many years to really take time to do this. This year has been a year where I had to – I have worked really hard with energies, – how to stabilize spiritual, physical and mental health. It is all connected. Through working with both ancient medicine, and school medicine – I have found my formula, and battled something that had to be tackled. (Last year was a hard one). What I am trying to say with all these words is simply; Take care of yourself. You have one body -and  your soul is stuck in it (at least for a while). Love yourself and feel that you are deserving of the attention you give yourself. Also; To work with shamanism is to control your own self – your own energies should be balanced when entering energy work. As with everything in life, it is that easy and that difficult. You need to know what you are doing. 

This is my second post that is (only) tapping into energy work, norse shamanism. To some of you, this might seem strange (which is totally okay). To me, it is completely natural and a conscious part of my life. To those of you who are interested; What would you like to know more about within this field?

Sincerely, Sól  / The Viking Queen

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part four) – The animal heads

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Five carved animal heads were found in the Oseberg grave. Four of them are displayed at the Viking Ship Museum for the public to behold. The fifth is in very poor condition, and the remains are therefore kept in the Museum’s depository. Because none of the animal heads are alike, researchers believe that the animal heads have been made by different woodcarvers. The heads are carved out of maple wood, and two of them are adorned with silver rivets. The making of the animal heads must have been quite the challenge. The woodcarver(s) had to find a naturally curved piece of wood from the lower part of a suitable tree trunk.

We do not know for certain what the animal heads have been used for. As with many of the mysteries of the Viking Age, one can only wonder. Four of the animal heads were found in the burial chamber, and one on the forward deck. They were all found with a rattle and a piece of rope. One of the ropes passed through the mouth of one of the animal heads, like reins. There was a shaft about half a meter long at the base of the neck of each of the heads. It is possible that the heads were carried using the shafts. They might also have been mounted on walls, or perhaps even on a throne (or anything, really). But most interessting of all is the theory that they had some sort of magical or religious significance. They might have played a significant part in offerings, and maybe the burial ritual of the Oseberg Queen herself.

Sources: Museum of Cultural History, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part three) The cart and sleighs

 oseberg77oseberg-pt3-9oseberg42oseberg-pt3-1 oseberg-pt3-2 oseberg-pt3-11oseberg-pt3-6oseberg-pt3-12oseberg-pt3-7  oseberg-pt3-10In The Oseberg Queen’s grave, there were more than 12 horses, 3 ceremonial sledges and a cart. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that there could have been a horse on either side. The cart (1st pic of this post) was probably only used for special occasions. The back of the cart is decorated with carvings of cats – often associated with our fertility goddess Frøya. The front end shows a man being attacked by serpents, possibly portraying the tale of Gunnar in the snake pit. The sleighs are made of different types of wood and were richly carved. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that they were pulled by two horses. We believe that the sleighs were made for pageantry and therefore, appearances were important. These carvings were enhanced by black and red paint, and tinplated nails were also part of the decoration. Unfortunately, the colours were difficult to preserve and cannot be seen today.

The best viking bling is ancient museum bling! 😉 I am always in awe when beholding the gorgeous Oseberg finds. Yass!

Sources: Uio, Museum of Cultural History & The Viking Ship Museum
Photosss: Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part two)

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Tools for textile production

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Two yarn winders for beechwood. The balls are balls of yarn;)

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Tent Frames. These objects were too fragile to be mounted in the correct position

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Tent plugs

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Authentic viking shoes. Behoooold! 

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Mystical rune inscription that possibly reads “unwise person”

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Chests, Boxes and Various Wooden Containers:

“The Oseberg grave was rich in chests, boxes and casks. The beautiful metal-bound buckets of yew-wood with gilded bronze fittings, were probably produced in England or Ireland. The Oseberg grave contained neither jewelry nor precious metals. Some of these items may have been deposited in this damaged chest and removed by the grave robbers who broke into the chamber.”

Text: The Viking Ship Museum, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir