The Gildehall at Borrehaugene, Norway

This is pretty much what my dream (long)house looks like. If I was filthy rich, I would build a reconstruction like this one right away! These photos were taken a few years ago, under the construction of the Gildehall in Horten. I was there long before they opened the Hall for the public eye and managed to snap these photos. I think it looked pretty amazing this way, as I am quite the fan of wood – but I must say that the blackish paint it sports now looks badass like Hel. I am going to Midgardblot this year too, and that will be a good chance to take quite a few photos of what it looks like these days. Photographing at the site will probably happen before that, though. My my iron horse (*cough* mercedes benz) and I frequently pass the area on our way to visit my parents and I often make a stop at Borrehaugene to breathe some norse vibes.

so tell me;
Are you going to Midgardsblot this year?

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

The Viking Ship Museum (part 2)

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Is is possible to be in love with an object? Or rather, in love with a with a ship? I believe I am. I’ve visited this museum countless times, to the point where it’ starting to get… awkward. You see, I’ve stood there in awe – glancing at The Oseberg ship in all its’ glory – my heart pounding heavily – my body trembling with admiration. And… It might just be me, but I think it is noticeable. At least by the guards (lol!) Like I’ve said before, guards “always” follow me around when I stroll through museums. The reason might be that I’m a big goofball with a huge smile. Not the average museum guest, but that one weirdo who is a bit too ‘happy go lucky’.
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This photo was taken outside the museum. Yup… I am clearly in love with the ship. Heh. 

The Oseberg Ship 

“The Oseberg ship was built in western Norway around the year 820. It is made of oak. Each of the strakes overlaps the one below and they are fixed with iron nails. Each side of the ship consists of 12 strakes, or planks. Below the waterline, they are only 2-3 cm thick, which makes the ship’s side very flexible. The two upper strakes are a little thicker. The deck is made of loose pine planks. The mast is also of pine and was between 10 and 13 metres high.

In the year 834, two prosperous women died. The Oseberg ship was pulled ashore and used as a burial ship for the two ladies. A burial chamber was dug right behind the ship’s mast. Inside, the walls were decorated with fantastic woven tapestries and the dead women lay on a raised bed. The women had a number of burial gifts with them. There were personal items such as clothes, shoes and combs, ship’s equipment, kitchen equipment, farm equipment, three ornate sledges and a working sledge, a wagon, five carved animal heads, five beds and two tents. There were fifteen horses, six dogs and two small cows. Investigation of the skeletons showed that the older woman was about 70 to 80 when she died, probably of cancer. The other woman was younger, a little over 50. We do not know what she died of.

Both of them must have held a special position in the community to have been given a grave such as this; were they political or religious leaders? Who was the most prominent person in the grave? Was one a sacrifice, to accompany the other into the kingdom of the dead? Were they related? Where did they come from? The two women from the past remain a mystery, but continued research may tell us more.”

Text:
UIO, Museum of Cultural History,
http://www.khm.uio.no/english/visit-us/viking-ship-museum/exhibitions/oseberg/

Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir – The Viking Queen

~Lofotr Viking Market, part two~

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Last summer, I went to Lofotr Viking Market with my dearest friends;
 Tathariel and Camilla Rose.

lofotr6 lofotr5Dried fish is the best snack in the whole world.
This is a protein bomb delicacy from the Northlofotr12The best thing about Viking Markets is that you get to see so much beautiful craftsmanship. It is great fun to meet so many lovely and talented men and women who are willing to share some of their knowledge, and have a crafty viking chat.lofotr10 lofotr11lofotr8Viking Tent. Simple, yet beautiful. lofotr13Damask worthy of Queens lofotr2 Whenever it feels like you are alone in in this weird, modern world, Remember this:
True friends will remain true to you no matter what happens. My friends have proven to me that they are trustworthy, honest and sincere. I feel so blessed to know them for I love them with all of my heathen heart!
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Oh, and…Don’t be fooled by their sweet, stunning appearance ~ These two are some of the wisest, strongest and toughest women I know. Viking Shieldmaidens unite! Even if the world crumbles, I know that they will stand by my side, and that I will always stand by theirs. That’s just the kind of people we are.

Veiztu, ef þú vin átt,
þann er þú vel trúir,
ok vill þú af hánum gótt geta,
geði skaltu við þann blanda
ok gjöfum skipta,
fara at finna oft.

~Hávamál, 44

~ The Viking Queen