Borrekapuangen ‘2018’, part two

 

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This summer hit us northerners hard with its’ immense and unusual warmth. Borrekaupangen was filled with sweaty and drowsy vikings, and I felt a bit lightheaded myself. I wondered if it was ever this warm during the Viking Age, remembering a gist of something I read somewhere. As I strolled through the marketplace I though of what it was really like back then, in every way. There are so many questions and so few answers… The thought of living to see felt both stressful and calming at the same time. The more I thought of it, the weirder it got until I just had to lay it aside and do something grounding and physical, like squeezing my boyfriend’s hand (“hey, we’re here, right now”). You see, I can easily get tangled up in thought experiments, backtracking and overthinking. On one hand it feeds my creative processes, but if I feed it too much energy, it kills them. All of us have creation and destruction forces within us – order and chaos is completely normal, but normal is utterly surreal. Life is so strange and at times it feels as if everything is moving in circles. This train of thought came and went as I greeted friends at the marked and picked up shiny object to behold. So…what was it like during the Viking Age? We won’t know for sure, but somehow, I feel sure of this- There’s nothing new under the sun. The human race is not that innovative and my reoccurring thoughts are not that original, in any way. So…What is the moral of my random common sense life lesson? I hope the archeologists dig up more viking graves that will make us ask more questions. I want to know more, and I am sure you do too.

Sól, The Viking Queen


 

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Kulturhistorisk museum, Oslo

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Gazing at bronze, silver and gold that has been dug up and put on display tends to give rise to more questions than answers. I kind of like that. It might even be the main reason why I love the Viking Age so much; The beauty, the mystery, the unknown. Viking Art and craftsmanship litterally makes me stand and gasp in awe. Next time I visit I will remember to pay more attention to the information. I shall not be blinded by the shiny jewelry! Good fucking luck, future me.

Sól, The Viking Queen

Viking Boob Bling is everything


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I am all about the Viking Boob Bling, so I made it a ‘hashtag thing’.
The more rows, the merrier. 
Would love to add more rows for that Pagan Peacocking Extraness.
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I have quite a few different Viking Boob Bling rows, and this is my bead combination of choice at the time. Behold! Switching up the colour scheme and bead combinations to match my Viking Garb is something I enjoy doing while watching TV.  Man, I wish I could present a more magical background activity, and tell you that I ask the gods for creative help in a special ceremony while chanting forgotten songs before engaging in the bead threading process… but that is simply not the case. (Keep in mind that I might do those things – just not whilst threading beads). Every piece of jewelry and every bead that I have means something special to me – on a totally random note -This reminds me of a really cool lady I met this summer – who said that she talked to her beads as she crafted them, and that they all had different personalities. She said that she threw away the nasty behaving beads because she didn’t like bullies, and then she cackled like a madwoman. That lady was cool. I hope I meet her again. 


On a random note – I have been looking for a silver pair of turtle brooches for what seems like forever.. This might be a shot in the dark – but please contact me if a collaboration/promotion sounds interesting. Yes, I am shamelessly putting it out there.

Wishing all of you a glorious weekend. I’m off to spend the last bit of this month’s student loan on food. Haha, The struggle is real! Who can relate…

Sól, The Viking Queen

Gudvangen Viking Market ‘2017’ (part one)

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Dear followers, it has been a while – but you have been in my thoughts. I have been doing so many exciting things lately, both here in my beloved country and in the US (which some of you might know a little something about already;) This viking Gal have been constantly on the move the past few months, and my feet have barely touched my own home since I moved in. Gudvangen Viking Market was the highlight of this summers Viking adventures. The last time I visited Gudvangen was four years ago (!) and what they have accomplished over there blew me away. I love the atmosphere, and people were including and warm. In a bit of a rush here – but I have so many pictures – stay tuned for much more from this place in the coming days.

– Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

The Gildehall at Borrehaugene, Norway

This is pretty much what my dream (long)house looks like. If I was filthy rich, I would build a reconstruction like this one right away! These photos were taken a few years ago, under the construction of the Gildehall in Horten. I was there long before they opened the Hall for the public eye and managed to snap these photos. I think it looked pretty amazing this way, as I am quite the fan of wood – but I must say that the blackish paint it sports now looks badass like Hel. I am going to Midgardblot this year too, and that will be a good chance to take quite a few photos of what it looks like these days. Photographing at the site will probably happen before that, though. My my iron horse (*cough* mercedes benz) and I frequently pass the area on our way to visit my parents and I often make a stop at Borrehaugene to breathe some norse vibes.

so tell me;
Are you going to Midgardsblot this year?

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part four) – The animal heads

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Five carved animal heads were found in the Oseberg grave. Four of them are displayed at the Viking Ship Museum for the public to behold. The fifth is in very poor condition, and the remains are therefore kept in the Museum’s depository. Because none of the animal heads are alike, researchers believe that the animal heads have been made by different woodcarvers. The heads are carved out of maple wood, and two of them are adorned with silver rivets. The making of the animal heads must have been quite the challenge. The woodcarver(s) had to find a naturally curved piece of wood from the lower part of a suitable tree trunk.

We do not know for certain what the animal heads have been used for. As with many of the mysteries of the Viking Age, one can only wonder. Four of the animal heads were found in the burial chamber, and one on the forward deck. They were all found with a rattle and a piece of rope. One of the ropes passed through the mouth of one of the animal heads, like reins. There was a shaft about half a meter long at the base of the neck of each of the heads. It is possible that the heads were carried using the shafts. They might also have been mounted on walls, or perhaps even on a throne (or anything, really). But most interessting of all is the theory that they had some sort of magical or religious significance. They might have played a significant part in offerings, and maybe the burial ritual of the Oseberg Queen herself.

Sources: Museum of Cultural History, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part three) The cart and sleighs

 oseberg77oseberg-pt3-9oseberg42oseberg-pt3-1 oseberg-pt3-2 oseberg-pt3-11oseberg-pt3-6oseberg-pt3-12oseberg-pt3-7  oseberg-pt3-10In The Oseberg Queen’s grave, there were more than 12 horses, 3 ceremonial sledges and a cart. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that there could have been a horse on either side. The cart (1st pic of this post) was probably only used for special occasions. The back of the cart is decorated with carvings of cats – often associated with our fertility goddess Frøya. The front end shows a man being attacked by serpents, possibly portraying the tale of Gunnar in the snake pit. The sleighs are made of different types of wood and were richly carved. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that they were pulled by two horses. We believe that the sleighs were made for pageantry and therefore, appearances were important. These carvings were enhanced by black and red paint, and tinplated nails were also part of the decoration. Unfortunately, the colours were difficult to preserve and cannot be seen today.

The best viking bling is ancient museum bling! 😉 I am always in awe when beholding the gorgeous Oseberg finds. Yass!

Sources: Uio, Museum of Cultural History & The Viking Ship Museum
Photosss: Sól Geirsdóttir