The Gildehall at Borrehaugene, Norway

This is pretty much what my dream (long)house looks like. If I was filthy rich, I would build a reconstruction like this one right away! These photos were taken a few years ago, under the construction of the Gildehall in Horten. I was there long before they opened the Hall for the public eye and managed to snap these photos. I think it looked pretty amazing this way, as I am quite the fan of wood – but I must say that the blackish paint it sports now looks badass like Hel. I am going to Midgardblot this year too, and that will be a good chance to take quite a few photos of what it looks like these days. Photographing at the site will probably happen before that, though. My my iron horse (*cough* mercedes benz) and I frequently pass the area on our way to visit my parents and I often make a stop at Borrehaugene to breathe some norse vibes.

so tell me;
Are you going to Midgardsblot this year?

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

Medieval inspired photoshoot

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Styling, makeup modeling– she
Photography: Kristian V

Decided to dress in medieval inspired gear, channel some shieldmaiden vibes and take quite a few photos the other day. It was cold as a Fimbulwinter outside, even though it doesn’t look that way, but it was good fun! Luckily, this location is literally right outside my parents house, so I could run inside afterwards- throw all the armor to the ground and enjoy a hot cuppa in front of the fireplace. I used to play in these woods as a kid, or rather – meditate in front of trees for hours. Yes – I was that boring, and of course a sworn tree hugger hippe spirit kind of kid. Bet you didn’t know that. Anyways – I love these items from my dusty wardrobe. Come to think of it – I could easily dress like this every day. The sword would make riding public transportation somewhat of a hassle due to weapon regulations, but hey – other than that, I doubt anyone in Oslo would bat an eye. That’s the beauty of living in a big city- no one cares, they’ve seen pretty much everything before.

BLablabla – I’ll post more pictures from this shoot very soon.

Sól Geirsdóttir

Basic Outfit

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Dress: Bik Bok
Belt and muffs: Claire’s
pelt: From a vintage shop in Nice, France

Ta daaaa – looking pretty basic today. Well -This is actually my second outfit of the day. Sometimes, I change clothes when I get home just to have a shift in energies. I wore something completely different to uni – something as rare as… trousers! I know, right? Strange and unusual (and quite revolutionary!) for someone who refused to wear that garment for over a decade. Come to think of it – I don’t think I’ve ever let myself get photographed in trousers… Maybe I ought to change that. Anyways, these outfit posts still feel a tad weird to me. But here ya go! hope you’re all having a good start to the week.

Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part two)

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Tools for textile production

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Two yarn winders for beechwood. The balls are balls of yarn;)

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Tent Frames. These objects were too fragile to be mounted in the correct position

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Tent plugs

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Authentic viking shoes. Behoooold! 

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Mystical rune inscription that possibly reads “unwise person”

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Chests, Boxes and Various Wooden Containers:

“The Oseberg grave was rich in chests, boxes and casks. The beautiful metal-bound buckets of yew-wood with gilded bronze fittings, were probably produced in England or Ireland. The Oseberg grave contained neither jewelry nor precious metals. Some of these items may have been deposited in this damaged chest and removed by the grave robbers who broke into the chamber.”

Text: The Viking Ship Museum, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir

Winter Viking (wee photoshoot)

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Photos by my Viking Man, Kristian ❤

Greetings from the North! Yule is upon us and Tis the season to be preparing oneself for a traditional Heathen celebration – Mead, meat and honey, family and loved ones. Be good to each other, people of Midgard. You never know what people around you might be struggling with and the gods knows that it is cold enough here already.

Sól Geirsdóttir – The Viking Queen

Norsk Folkemuseum (Part One)

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Setesdal Farmstead, (anno 1739) nfm8nfm10
I wore Viking Bling, vintage cross fox fur and a deep red lipstick. nfm6nfm7nfm2nfm4

Made a spontaneous decision to visit Norsk Folkemuseum last weekend (living in Oslo makes it easy to do stuff like this.) Besides, I’m not much of a party lion -getting cultural inspiration is much cooler than clubbing;)  If you have followed my blog for a while you’re probably well aware of my fascination for old buildings, especially wooden ones. I absolutely adore weird, crooked, wood-carved stuff- everything from roots to houses!  What better place to be for a creature like me than an outdoor museum? I mean, how epic is that? Norsk Folkemuseum is the largest museum of cultural history. it has 160 different buildings from rural and urban Norway – from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. Of course – my favorites are the oldest stuff. Twirling in leaves amongst old lofts made me feel so alive, it was spiritual food for my ancient soul…Modern day time-travel is my kind of fun! Unfortunately, I had very little time when I visited so I literally RAN through it while I was shooting pictures like a maniac. Quite the workout, I must say.

Ever been to this glorious place? What’s your favourite part? 
Ps: Moar pictures to come in my next post.

– Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

The Viking Ship Museum (part 2)

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Is is possible to be in love with an object? Or rather, in love with a with a ship? I believe I am. I’ve visited this museum countless times, to the point where it’ starting to get… awkward. You see, I’ve stood there in awe – glancing at The Oseberg ship in all its’ glory – my heart pounding heavily – my body trembling with admiration. And… It might just be me, but I think it is noticeable. At least by the guards (lol!) Like I’ve said before, guards “always” follow me around when I stroll through museums. The reason might be that I’m a big goofball with a huge smile. Not the average museum guest, but that one weirdo who is a bit too ‘happy go lucky’.
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This photo was taken outside the museum. Yup… I am clearly in love with the ship. Heh. 

The Oseberg Ship 

“The Oseberg ship was built in western Norway around the year 820. It is made of oak. Each of the strakes overlaps the one below and they are fixed with iron nails. Each side of the ship consists of 12 strakes, or planks. Below the waterline, they are only 2-3 cm thick, which makes the ship’s side very flexible. The two upper strakes are a little thicker. The deck is made of loose pine planks. The mast is also of pine and was between 10 and 13 metres high.

In the year 834, two prosperous women died. The Oseberg ship was pulled ashore and used as a burial ship for the two ladies. A burial chamber was dug right behind the ship’s mast. Inside, the walls were decorated with fantastic woven tapestries and the dead women lay on a raised bed. The women had a number of burial gifts with them. There were personal items such as clothes, shoes and combs, ship’s equipment, kitchen equipment, farm equipment, three ornate sledges and a working sledge, a wagon, five carved animal heads, five beds and two tents. There were fifteen horses, six dogs and two small cows. Investigation of the skeletons showed that the older woman was about 70 to 80 when she died, probably of cancer. The other woman was younger, a little over 50. We do not know what she died of.

Both of them must have held a special position in the community to have been given a grave such as this; were they political or religious leaders? Who was the most prominent person in the grave? Was one a sacrifice, to accompany the other into the kingdom of the dead? Were they related? Where did they come from? The two women from the past remain a mystery, but continued research may tell us more.”

Text:
UIO, Museum of Cultural History,
http://www.khm.uio.no/english/visit-us/viking-ship-museum/exhibitions/oseberg/

Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir – The Viking Queen