Kulturhistorisk museum, Oslo

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Gazing at bronze, silver and gold that has been dug up and put on display tends to give rise to more questions than answers. I kind of like that. It might even be the main reason why I love the Viking Age so much; The beauty, the mystery, the unknown. Viking Art and craftsmanship litterally makes me stand and gasp in awe. Next time I visit I will remember to pay more attention to the information. I shall not be blinded by the shiny jewelry! Good fucking luck, future me.

Sól, The Viking Queen

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Kulturhistorisk museum – Stave church portals

 
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Ål Stave church, Hallingdal, 1100
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Stave church portal, Åtrå church, Tinn, Telemark 1163-1189
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Stave church portal, Sauland church, Hjartdal, Telemark c. 1200

You know me – I love museums. Kulturhistorisk museum (in Oslo, Norway), is one of my absolute favorites, and I have visited it numerous times. Never have I ever met anyone as excited as I am at museums. I take TONS of pictures, get down on one knee and speak softly to the wood carvings as I photograph them. To me, this is the best form of meditative exercise there is. Every time I behold these carvings feels like the first. There is always a new detail to take notice of, no matter how many times I’ve seen them. I think this goes without saying, but I adore norse wood carvings and one day I hope to have a replica of one of these as my front door… sigh… THAT would be absolute bliss.

Would you like to see more photos from this museum? 

Sól, The Viking Queen.

Lom Stave church

lom5lom12lom1lom6lom11lom9lom10lom3“Lom stave church was originally build around 1160. In the 17th century an extension onto the west transepts, a sacristy and the large central tower with a high steeple surrounded by four smaller towers were added. In the Middle Ages, Lom stave church was the most important church between Nidaros (Trondheim) and Hamar. Like today Lom was a busy crossroad between east and west. The church is decorated with acanthus baroque wood carvings. During the excavations in 1973, a lot of interesting things were found; the largest collection of old coins ever found in Norway, and a love letter written in runic characters.” – a tourist sign at the site. 

During our Norway sightseeing vacation, we stopped in Lom, Norway to behold this stave church. I have very mixed feelings about stave churches. Indeed, they are beautiful and what interests me about them is the architecture, -or rather- the norse wood carvings. But…they remind me of a time where christianity was violently forced upon the vikings. I think that says more than enough about how I feel, and I’ll leave it at that. *Just so it’s said: believe what you will, be kind and respectful to others. We are all allowed to have faith in whatever we have faith in. Peace out!*

Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

 

Gudvangen Viking Market ‘2017’ (part one)

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Dear followers, it has been a while – but you have been in my thoughts. I have been doing so many exciting things lately, both here in my beloved country and in the US (which some of you might know a little something about already;) This viking Gal have been constantly on the move the past few months, and my feet have barely touched my own home since I moved in. Gudvangen Viking Market was the highlight of this summers Viking adventures. The last time I visited Gudvangen was four years ago (!) and what they have accomplished over there blew me away. I love the atmosphere, and people were including and warm. In a bit of a rush here – but I have so many pictures – stay tuned for much more from this place in the coming days.

– Sól Geirsdóttir, The Viking Queen

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part four) – The animal heads

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Five carved animal heads were found in the Oseberg grave. Four of them are displayed at the Viking Ship Museum for the public to behold. The fifth is in very poor condition, and the remains are therefore kept in the Museum’s depository. Because none of the animal heads are alike, researchers believe that the animal heads have been made by different woodcarvers. The heads are carved out of maple wood, and two of them are adorned with silver rivets. The making of the animal heads must have been quite the challenge. The woodcarver(s) had to find a naturally curved piece of wood from the lower part of a suitable tree trunk.

We do not know for certain what the animal heads have been used for. As with many of the mysteries of the Viking Age, one can only wonder. Four of the animal heads were found in the burial chamber, and one on the forward deck. They were all found with a rattle and a piece of rope. One of the ropes passed through the mouth of one of the animal heads, like reins. There was a shaft about half a meter long at the base of the neck of each of the heads. It is possible that the heads were carried using the shafts. They might also have been mounted on walls, or perhaps even on a throne (or anything, really). But most interessting of all is the theory that they had some sort of magical or religious significance. They might have played a significant part in offerings, and maybe the burial ritual of the Oseberg Queen herself.

Sources: Museum of Cultural History, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part three) The cart and sleighs

 oseberg77oseberg-pt3-9oseberg42oseberg-pt3-1 oseberg-pt3-2 oseberg-pt3-11oseberg-pt3-6oseberg-pt3-12oseberg-pt3-7  oseberg-pt3-10In The Oseberg Queen’s grave, there were more than 12 horses, 3 ceremonial sledges and a cart. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that there could have been a horse on either side. The cart (1st pic of this post) was probably only used for special occasions. The back of the cart is decorated with carvings of cats – often associated with our fertility goddess Frøya. The front end shows a man being attacked by serpents, possibly portraying the tale of Gunnar in the snake pit. The sleighs are made of different types of wood and were richly carved. The placement of the sledge shafts indicate that they were pulled by two horses. We believe that the sleighs were made for pageantry and therefore, appearances were important. These carvings were enhanced by black and red paint, and tinplated nails were also part of the decoration. Unfortunately, the colours were difficult to preserve and cannot be seen today.

The best viking bling is ancient museum bling! 😉 I am always in awe when beholding the gorgeous Oseberg finds. Yass!

Sources: Uio, Museum of Cultural History & The Viking Ship Museum
Photosss: Sól Geirsdóttir

The glorious Viking Ship Museum (part two)

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Tools for textile production

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Two yarn winders for beechwood. The balls are balls of yarn;)

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Tent Frames. These objects were too fragile to be mounted in the correct position

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Tent plugs

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Authentic viking shoes. Behoooold! 

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Mystical rune inscription that possibly reads “unwise person”

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Chests, Boxes and Various Wooden Containers:

“The Oseberg grave was rich in chests, boxes and casks. The beautiful metal-bound buckets of yew-wood with gilded bronze fittings, were probably produced in England or Ireland. The Oseberg grave contained neither jewelry nor precious metals. Some of these items may have been deposited in this damaged chest and removed by the grave robbers who broke into the chamber.”

Text: The Viking Ship Museum, UiO
Photos: Sól Geirsdóttir